8 Extracurricular Activities to Do at College That’ll Look Great on Your CV

Getting a job when you finish college isn’t the easiest thing to do. In fact, you’ll probably find that most graduate jobs will expect a certain amount of experience before you’re even considered for the role, which might seem a bit contradictory but that’s the way it is these days.

Fortunately, there are numerous activities that you can do to make your CV stand out and demonstrate that you have the skills that employers are looking for. We’ve put together a list of our favourites so that you can pick which ones suit you best – you never know, you might find one or two that you even enjoy.

Part-Time Work

Although securing part-time work takes effort, it’s one of the most beneficial activities for both you and your CV. While you’re earning yourself a few extra euros, you’ll also be learning essential skills that will help you out when you start your career. Most part-time roles will require you to work as a team, manage your time and communicate with others – all of which will be welcome additions to your CV.

Some customer-facing roles call for an ability to work under pressure, deal with difficult situations and handle cash, proving that you’ll be a reliable and trustworthy member of staff.

Continue Reading

Kavanagh Court – The Man Behind the Name

Having one of those ‘what is life?’ days? Questioning your own existence, where you are what’s your name? While we may not be able to help you out with that…we can shed some light on Kavanagh Court‘s name, why it was picked, and who Kavanagh was.

The man, the mystery

Kavanagh Court is named after one of Ireland’s most well-loved poets, Patrick Kavanagh. Born in 1904, Kavanagh became one of the major Irish writers of the 20th Century and remains celebrated today. His peers include Samuel Beckett and W.B. Yeats, the latter whose work Kavanagh strongly disliked. Today, you can find landmarks dedicated to each of these figures dotted around Dublin, including Beckett Bridge and, of course, the statue of Kavanagh along the Grand Canal, also known as ‘The Crank on the Bank’. Why not take a stroll and pay old Kav a visit?

Kavanagh began his writing career in the last years of the Irish Literary Renaissance, a movement that paralleled the rise of nationalism in Ireland after the country gained independence from Great Britain after WW1. Irish poets and writers felt freer from the constraints of English literary styles and began to express themselves on subjects more uniquely Irish with which they were more familiar, such as the nation’s impoverished peasants and labour and toil in Ireland’s rural areas.

Continue Reading